Genetically modified plants may prove to be beneficial to our health

A common houseplant has been genetically modified, but are the results beneficial to our health? Researchers at the University of Washington may have the answer!

In case you needed more justification for your next houseplant purchase, newly released research will make your decision easier. Researchers at the University of Washington have successfully modified a common houseplant that will reduce hazardous compounds often found in our homes.

You’ve been exposed to volatile compounds such as chloroform and benzene in your home unless it was built with sustainable products. Chlorinated water releases small chloroform molecules into the air through evaporation. A gas furnace or stove, a car being stored in a garage, or a lawnmower are sources of Benzene. Both of these compounds have direct links to cancer.

How do genetically modified plant protect us from Chloroform and Benzene?

While genetically modifying a plant may be beneficial although it is potentially ethically complicated. Researchers at UofW were able to genetically modify pothos ivy to remove both chloroform and benzene from the air. Pothos ivy that has been modified is unable to be reproduced through pollination. Pothos ivy has little to no chance of flowering when grown in indoors.

What do researchers already know about genetically modifying Pothos ivy?

Modified pothos ivy expresses a protein called 2E1 that removes chloroform and benzene from the air. This protein is present only in the liver of mammals. Researchers at UofW set out to determine if it can function in the same manner in plants. The result of the study would be the creation of an external, or green, liver. The plants remove harmful compounds by transforming them into carbon dioxide and chloride ions. Plants then use these ions to produce their food. The same ions are also important for the creations of Phenol. This compound is essential for plant cell wall formation.

The data proves to be encouraging

When tested, the genetically modified pothos was able to decrease the amount of chloroform in the air by 82% after three days and was undetectable by the 6th day. Benzene concentrations were decreased by approximately 75 percent by day eight.

The full study is available to read in Environmental Science & Technology.

A common houseplant has been genetically modified, but are the results beneficial to our health? Researchers at the University of Washington may have the answer!
#PrimroseCreations #LoveTheLifeYouLive #ScienceBehindItAll #Pothos #Houseplants #IndoorPlants #Botany #GMO
A common houseplant has been genetically modified, but are the results beneficial to our health? Researchers at the University of Washington may have the answer!